Upcycle your empty feed bags: garden/chore apron tutorial

Do you ever wish there was something fun you could do with all those empty feed bags? In the tutorial below, courtesy of Lisa from Fresh Eggs Daily, you’ll learn make this fun and easy care apron from one or two of those empty feed sacks!

Nutrena feed bags are not only attractive and use vibrant colors, they are also made of waterproof material.  I thought the pattern on this particular Nutrena Layer feed bag would be a natural for a garden apron that will not only keep you clean, but be a cinch to hose off when you’re done. This apron would also be perfect for washing the car, mucking stalls, tending to a sick or injured hen, or any other messy chores. If you’re the least bit crafty you can whip up an apron in just minutes! 

Here’s what you’ll need:
One Nutrena feed bag, rinsed off and dried (you’ll need a second one if you choose to add the optional pocket along the bottom)
Two 30″ long pieces of webbing or wide ribbon for the waist ties
Coordinating spool of thread and bobbin
Sewing machine fitted with a 90/14 medium-weight needle
Tape measure
Pinking shears
Sewing scissors
Straight Pins

Here’s what you do:
Cut off the bottom of the bag and then cut straight up the back of the bag so it lies flat. 

Centering your cut depending on the design on the bag you choose, cut out your apron using the measurements below.

 From one of the discarded side panels, cut your neck strap to measure 26″ long and 2 1/2″ wide.  If you choose to add the optional pockets, cut a piece from a second bag the same width and 10″ high to match the design of lower portion of your apron.

 

To assemble your apron, fold each long edge of your neck strap over so it ends up being about 3/4″ wide and then sew using a zig zag stitch up one side and down the other to secure.

 Sew along the top edge of your pocket then align where it will go on your apron and pin it in place.

Turn the curved edges along the sides of the apron under about 1/4″ and pin, then turn all the straight edges over 1/2″ and then 1/2″ again and also pin in place, positioning your neck strap and two side ties in place and securing them also with pins.

 Tuck your neck strap and side ties under the seam allowance and then flip them over into place.

Starting at the bottom edge, sew all the way around along the seam, removing the pins as you go.

 

To make your pocket compartments, sew straight up from the bottom edge to the top of the pocket – one or two times depending on how many sections you want. 

And you’re done! 

 (apron without the optional row of pockets along the bottom)

(apron with the pockets)

Your apron can be hosed off, sponged off, or even tossed in the washing machine.  I wouldn’t put it in the dryer though. And don’t try to iron it unless you use a cloth in between the iron and the apron.  Same goes for using this as a bbq apron….while not flammable, the apron WILL melt if touched with an open flame or hot bbq utensil, so use caution and common sense.

Tutorial courtesy of Lisa from Fresh Eggs Daily
www.fresh-eggs-daily.com

Keeping Hens and Horses

A recent post on our Nutrena Chicken and Poultry Feed Facebook page asked an outstanding question – is it okay to let my chickens out in the pasture to range with my horse? Not only is it okay, it is actually a good idea! Keeping chickens along with horses is a time honored tradition that certainly can be manageable, and even beneficial – here’s why:

  • Chickens are opportunists. When a pellet or kernel falls, they’ll be there to pick it up. This saves your horse from mouthing around on the ground to find bits of feed (a practice that can lead to ingestion of dirt and sand) and it reduces the amount of feed that is wasted.
  • Chickens are good horse trainers. A horse that has had exposure to poultry won’t “have his feathers ruffled” by sudden movements, loud noises, or the occasional appearance of an egg…
  • Chickens help prepare your horse for the trail. If you plan to take trail rides where wild turkeys, partridge, chuckar, etc. populate it can be beneficial to have your horse used to the patterns and noises of fowl by keeping a few chickens around. A little exposure to flapping, squawking and scurrying can go a long way to desensitizing your horse to those types of events out on the trail.
  • Chickens are nature’s fly traps. You and your horse hate bugs – but chickens love them. Chickens eat flies, worms, grubs, bees; if they can catch it they’ll nibble on it, which means it won’t be nibbling on you or your horse.
  • Chickens are low maintenance. Provide them with a cozy place to sleep, fresh clean water, free choice oyster shell for strong eggshells, grit for digestion and some layer feed and they will be happy and healthy.
  • Chickens help with the chores! One of a chicken’s favorite things to do is scratch the ground for hidden treasures. Give them a pile of horse droppings and they think they’re in heaven! They’ll have the manure broken down, spread around and out of sight before you can even think of grabbing a pitchfork and wheelbarrow!
  • Chickens are pets with benefits. Besides being a colorful and entertaining addition to your stable yard, chickens provide one thing your horse can’t – breakfast! Now if they could only cook it and serve it to you in bed…

A few words of caution about keeping chickens with your horses – make sure that your chickens are fed seperately from your horse and that your horse can’t get into their feed. This will eliminate the risk of your horse consuming layer feed that is not designed for his digestive system. Also, provide roosts for your chickens that are away from your horse’s feeder if they are not put into a coop at night to eliminate waste of feed and hay due to chicken droppings. Make sure both your horse and chickens have fresh, clean water that is easily accessible to them at all times.